The Objective Blog

The Radar: May 20, 2015

May 21st, 2015 - by Julie Hale - Salt Lake City, Utah

Keeping up with design and technology is a lot of work. Luckily, we enjoy wading through the noise just to find the gems of awesomeness sprinkled throughout. The Radar is our gift to you, Current or Potential Client, so that you can enjoy all of the awesome without any of the drudgery. Unwrap it each week, and know that you’re loved by the geeks and pixel-pushers at Objective.

The Good and Evil of Content Strategy

Good read on when and how to use personalized content.

Full Article

Speeding Up the Web

Google’s new QUIC protocol aims to combine some of the best features of UDP and TCP with modern security tools.

Full Article

3D Holographics…Finally?

Despite all the movies about the future, it is still amazing when something from one of them actually looks like it could become a reality.

Full Article

Speaking Hexadecimal

Is it time to create English words to pronounce hexadecimal number combinations? You be the judge.

Full Article

The Accessibility Project

Excellent resource detailing how to make web applications accessible for everyone.  Also helps dispel common myths that developers believe about building accessible applications.

How-tos and Myths

Makerbook

Need fonts, photos, graphics or music for your project? Here’s a hand-picked directory of the best free resources for creatives.

Makerbook

The Secret of My Success

Graphic Designer, Paula Scher, discusses her worst jobs, her biggest challenge as a designer, and her productivity secret (EMBRACE BOREDOM!).

Full Article

Javascript Promises

Here’s an article that demonstrates some common pitfalls when working with Javascript promises. If not used correctly, your code may not run in the order that you’d expect it to. This link is an example from the author demonstrating that.

Full Article

Be Mobile-Friendly or…

Google’s new algorithm will greatly hinder search results for websites that aren’t mobile-friendly. Time to go mobile or get buried.

Full Article

Input Type Sandbox

A way to test the near-infinite combination of input types, validation patterns and attributes across any device, OS or browser, to see how onscreen keyboards and HTML5 validation behaviors react.

Sandbox

The Radar: May 14, 2015

May 14th, 2015 - by Agency Fusion - Salt Lake City, Utah

Keeping up with design and technology is a lot of work. Luckily, we enjoy wading through the noise just to find the gems of awesomeness sprinkled throughout. The Radar is our gift to you, Current or Potential Client, so that you can enjoy all of the awesome without any of the drudgery. Unwrap it each week, and know that you’re loved by the geeks and pixel-pushers at Objective.

Backbone Forms

By default, Backbone lacks data binding between your data domain and your views. This small library helps bridge the gap by providing an easy and declarative way to render forms.

Backbone Forms

Sketch for Designers

Sketch, our new favorite design tool, is popular elsewhere.

Full Article

Piano App

This app lets you skip real piano lessons and play classical piano pieces using your keyboard. It’s not about what keys you hit, just the timing of your keystrokes.

Piano App

Electron

Electron is a way to package desktop applications backed by node.js. It is currently used in the atom.io editor and for slack’s client.

Electron

Language and World View

The language you speak can affect how you view the world.

Full Article

Brand Evolution

A bit of discussion about how brands can evolve to stay current, yet consistent.

Full Article

Freeze Your Keys

To protect from thieves, you may want to start keeping your key fob in your freezer if you own a newer car with keyless entry.

Full Article

Tips for a Fast Vagrant Environment

If you’re using Vagrant for your development environments, Rails projects that compile Sass and CoffeeScript on each page refresh can load very slowly. Here are three things you can do to speed it up.

Full Article

Lilly

A drone with a camera that follows you.

Lilly

100 Days of Fonts

Do-Hee Kim is showcasing a different Google font pairing every day for 100 days.

100 Days of Fonts

Agency Fusion is Now Objective

April 22nd, 2015 - by Agency Fusion - Salt Lake City, Utah

Welcome to the new us. We’re still the same people in the same place, but we’ve given our brand a major overhaul.

Why Rebrand?

We’re twelve years old this year. At this point you might assume everything is nailed down and set in stone for us but the truth is, a lot has changed since 2003: The economy is different, our industry has evolved, our business model has shifted, and our team is different. In short, it’s time to update our brand to more accurately reflect who we are today and where we are headed.

A Brand that Pulls Us

You’ll find dozens of different definitions for what a brand is. This post isn’t about creating a new definition, but we do want to share a bit about what we think a brand should do for the employees of a company as partial explanation for why we’re changing our brand.

We believe a brand should be aspirational to the people working for the company. The brand should support the company’s vision and provide a framework within which to communicate that vision. For employees, their ability and their desire to “get on board” with a company’s vision are in part shaped by the brand itself. The brand helps create that ever-so-important feeling of “I’m part of something great.”

Over time we came to feel that our former name “Agency Fusion” was pulling us backward instead of drawing us toward the future we were working hard to achieve. The old name, because of our old positioning, felt like baggage we were fighting against, instead of a brand that we are aspiring to build in the direction we’ve been heading.

Evolution and Revolution

When we chose the name Agency Fusion, we wanted a name that represented our core business model. At the time the majority of our revenue came from providing education and development services to other creative agencies. As far as we know, we pioneered the phrase, “You design it. We build it.” This business model worked well for years but with the economic downturn in 2008-2009, the flaws of this model were exposed in a dire way.

Rather than continue to rely on business from other creative agencies, we opted to begin transitioning away from this business model. Over time we shifted from getting most of our revenue from other agencies, to now getting the majority of our revenue from our own clients and our own software products.

We’re fans of a Harvard Business Review article about how companies go through periods of evolution and revolution. Our big shift in our business model was a time of revolution that likely saved us from an early demise. Our name, however, has been stuck back in the pre-2009 days of our existence and this rebrand aims to fix that.

Today the types of projects we choose to accept are bigger and more complex than in our former life. We work for a lot of startups and often for big companies who want to launch a new product or act more like a startup. We’re less of an ad agency and more of a digital product design and development company. If you mashed up an ad agency, a startup, a software development firm, and a business consultancy you’d have something very much like us. People hire us when they need to create something both technical and elegant, and when they’re willing to invest what it takes to do it right.

Looking to the Future

A full rebrand is time consuming. We’re still dotting i’s and crossing t’s to roll out our new brand. We hope the change has minimal negative impact on our clients. Our proposals, invoices, and other documents will have a new look. Accounting or accounts payable departments will need to update our vendor profile (the new name is a DBA so our tax ID stays the same). Clients will need to contact us using our new email addresses (although the old ones will continue to forward for a while). But other than these few inconveniences, everything else moves forward as before but with a new brand that works with us instead of against us.

 

Fusion Radar: April 15, 2015

April 16th, 2015 - by Agency Fusion - Salt Lake City, Utah

Keeping up with technology is a lot of work. Luckily, we enjoy wading through the noise just to find the gems of awesomeness sprinkled throughout. Fusion Radar is our gift to you, Current or Potential Client, so that you can enjoy all of the awesome without any of the drudgery. Unwrap it each week, and know that you’re loved by the geeks and pixel-pushers at Agency Fusion.

Smart Dust

The Michigan Micro Mote (M3) project at the University of Michigan has built a computer one cubic millimeter in size. One possible use is to insert them into the brain to monitor tumors or evaluate head trauma.

Full article

Improving Rendering Performance

An in-depth and worthwhile read from Google Developers about improving rendering performance and reducing jank.

Full article

Free Photos

Here’s another resource for free photos.

Full article

Your Passwords

Your passwords might not be as strong as you think.

Full article

Learning Regular Expressions

You should learn regular expressions. They’re incredibly powerful and useful, even for non-developers.

Full article

Fusion Radar: April 8, 2015

April 9th, 2015 - by Agency Fusion - Salt Lake City, Utah

Keeping up with technology is a lot of work. Luckily, we enjoy wading through the noise just to find the gems of awesomeness sprinkled throughout. Fusion Radar is our gift to you, Current or Potential Client, so that you can enjoy all of the awesome without any of the drudgery. Unwrap it each week, and know that you’re loved by the geeks and pixel-pushers at Agency Fusion.

Dropplets

In terms of simplicity, it’s hard to beat Dropplets for a stripped-down, bare-bones blogging platform. It doesn’t even require a database.

Dropplets

Vector

Netflix released some on-host performance monitoring software called “Vector.” It’s a client-side application based in d3 and angular, and presents data gathered by another piece of software called “Performance Co-Pilot (PCP).”

Vector

Continuations in Ruby

Continuations allow you to persist the state of your stack and registers to the heap. This can be used for a variety of things: program control flow, implementing tail-recursion in languages that do not offer proper tail-recursion, and so on.

Learn more

Oyster

Oyster is a subscription service for reading books on your smart devices.

Oyster

Google Pac Man

You’ve likely already played Pac Man on Google Maps. Wired Magazine presents their 15 top locations for playing the game.

Full article

Firefox’s BroadcastChannel

The BroadcastChannel API now works in Firefox Developer Edition. It allows an app to send alerts to other browser tabs that have the same app open. So, if you have multiple tabs for some app open, and you log in in one of the tabs, it can update the other tabs (without refreshing) to show that you are logged in there as well.

Full article

Galen Framework

Galen helps automate the testing of front-end look and feel.

Galen Framework

Codie on Indiegogo

We’re fans of anything that results in more developers in the world, even if it means starting them young. Codie is a robotic toy that helps kids learn how to program. Buy one for your kid; we’ll keep an eye out for their resume.

Codie